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EKO 65" Frameless QLED 4K Ultra HD Android TV $699 @ Big W

870

Another price drop for this TV.
Previous deal was $749, so this TV is now on LED price range.
Product Features:
4K Ultra HD with QLED Technology for enhanced picture quality, brightness and colour
Frameless design providing a slim TV and removing the thick frames of standard televisions.
Android TV 9.0 OS - All the content that you love, exactly how you want it. Welcome to a smarter way to watch.
Google Play Store - With the Google Play Store for Android TV, whatever you're into, there's an app you're sure to love.
Android TV comes with your Google Assistant built in. Just press the Google Assist button on your remote control to quickly find the latest blockbuster or check the score of the big game.
Chromecast Built-In - With Android TV, you can quickly cast photos, videos, music and other content that you love from your favourite device straight to your TV.
HDR (High Dynamic Range) - Delivering a more realistic image with finer detailed levels of contrast and superior colour accuracy.
4K NETFLIX, 4K AMAZON PRIME VIDEO AND 4K YOUTUBE Pre-installed for your viewing pleasure.
NETFLIX and YOUTUBE buttons on remote for easy access.
1.07 Billion Colours

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closed Comments

  • need the 75 incher to be on sale, please do it

  • You'd be much better off paying a hundred more for the same brand tele, at the same store, but 10 inches bigger
    https://www.bigw.com.au/product/eko-75-4k-ultra-hd-smart-tv-...

    • QLED not mean anything anymore?

      • What do you imagine QLED actually gives you?

        • better brightness/contrast (relatively to standard LED of course, obviously OLED is much much better)

        • Sounds like it gives better colours than LED, more like OLED, but without the extreme contrast and black levels OLED is so prized for:

          https://gadgets.ndtv.com/tv/features/oled-vs-qled-vs-led-tv-....

        • Let's start with a quick summary of the two technologies.

          OLED stands for "organic light emitting diode."
          QLED (according to Samsung) stands for "quantum dot LED TV."
          OLED is a fundamentally different technology from LCD, the major type of TV today.
          QLED is a variation of LED LCD, adding a quantum dot film to the LCD "sandwich."
          OLED is "emissive," meaning the pixels emit their own light.
          QLED, like LCD, is, in its current form, "transmissive" and relies on an LED backlight.

          The main takeaway is that QLED is closer to regular old LCD than it is to OLED, which is considered as a distinctly different class of television, much like plasma was before it.

          • @systema: Summary: QLED is backlight method. Panel is still traditional LCD.

            • +1 vote

              @AlexF:

              Summary: QLED is backlight method.

              Hmm… this is purely semantics but I wouldn't say it's a backlight method which people typically associate with edge-lit or direct backlighting/FALD (or even CCFL vs LED). QLED is an enhancement layer that improves colours, which isn't typically associated with backlighting methods.

              Panel is still traditional LCD.

              Yup. Definitely not OLED, although colors can be pretty good in comparison to OLED.

              • @eug:

                QLED is an enhancement layer that improves colours,

                it's "paint" over blue LEDs, used for backlight.

                • @AlexF: Exactly.
                  This is still an "LCD" television. And the standards for this is as loose as it can be. For instance, a HUGE difference between a Luxury/Flagship QLED (eg Samsung) versus a Budget/No Brand QLED (eg This one).

                  Also, QLED was invented to trick consumers as it seems like OLED at face-value. And it's not even True QLED, as that entails individual light emmiting pixels, and not a separation filter.

                  With that said, there is likely to be some improvements in this TV, compared to a Budget LCD from say 5-years ago. And many people want to buy the LG OLED TVs, but end up knowingly getting a Samsung "Fake QLED" due the constant fear of screen burn-in.

                  • @Kangal:

                    And it's not even True QLED, as that entails individual light emmiting pixels, and not a separation filter.

                    Wouldn't that be OLED? Qled isnt individually lit pixels from my understanding.

                    • @Duff5000: Nope.
                      OLED is for organic diodes, thus Organic Light Emitting Diode. Whilst QLED is for synthetic diodes aka "quantum dots", thus Quantum-dot Light Emitting Diode. However, as noted, you cannot buy any True QLED TV…. none exists outside of R&D Labs.

                      What we get is a colour-filter which they call "the quantum dot" (which is misleading), sandwiched on top of an LCD screen, and behind that is an LED backlight. So what they're actually supposed to be called is a new moniker like "Ultra LCD". Or if they really insist they can call it QLCD-LED, which would be short for Quantum-layer Liquid Crystal Display with Low Energy Diode backlight (what a mouthful!!).

                      • @Kangal: I know what OLED is. I was questioning you saying QLED is individually lit pixels.

                        QLED is lit dots behind an LCD, not pixels. There are a couple of methods of making those dots light up. The pixels are still LCD, the backlighting is q dots.

                  • +1 vote

                    @Kangal:

                    Also, QLED was invented to trick consumers as it seems like OLED at face-value.

                    Quantum dot displays use a legit technology that improves colours. It is not a "trick".

                    And it's not even True QLED, as that entails individual light emmiting pixels, and not a separation filter.

                    Photo-emissive quantum dot displays are still quantum dot displays. You are thinking of electro-emissive or electroluminiscent quantum displays which do not exist commercially.

                    The key benefit to quantum dot displays is the narrow emission bandwidth for each colour. The FWHM (full width at half maximum) of a good phosphor used in a normal TV is at least double of a good quantum dot. The narrower the bandwidth the purer the colors can be, allowing for a very wide colour gamut and high CRI light output. All this is achieved with a film at the moment as they are heat-sensitive so they can't be placed directly on a bright light source. On-chip QD is in development but is probably a while away from commercial deployment. In the meantime, photo-emissive QD is here and it does work.

                    What we get is a colour-filter which they call "the quantum dot" (which is misleading), sandwiched on top of an LCD screen, and behind that is an LED backlight.

                    It is not a colour filter (you find that in traditional LCDs, called photo resists), and there is no traditional LED backlight. It is an emissive layer that is excited by a UV LED backlight. The 'quantum' part refers to the unique properties the particles have due to their size, based on quantum mechanics. The emissive part is just the usual process with excited electrons transitioning from the valence to the conductance band releasing photons on the way back down.

    • NO QLED - NO Android TV. you're exchanging picture quality and smart TV software for size.

    • The interesting part of the 75" inch unit is actually that it runs on WebOS and uses ThinQ AI (according to EKO's website - https://www.eko-entertainment.com.au/webos-tvs)

      Both WebOS and ThinQ AI are trademarks and technologies owned by LG - this suggests to me that the 75 incher might actually be OEMed by / rebadged from LG instead of a run off the mill white box product.

      • Spot on mate. I own the 75" and its a beast of a tv. 4K HDR is simply amazing.

        • the 75" you own is that the QLED version or the other one with WebOS? I'm planning to get one, have you had any problems with it?

          The 75" non QLED or the 65" QLED one still can't decide

      • OOOH - now that changes my direction of thought………An LG version cheap brand that could be slipped into the house all the while saying to the Mrs is and LG see!
        ….and cheaper!

      • The 75 inch one seems more like a poor mans LG. Which is different to the typical Android based TVs selling for this price point.

      • Had a read of this https://www.ayonz.com/post/eko-launches-new-75-4k-ultra-hd-s.... All EKO did was strike an agreement to use LG's WebOS for it's 75" smart TV. I believe only WebOS was used and the rest remains EKO's. I would assume the panels and other hardware should be the same as the other sizes, only different OS. Assuming that is correct, only user experience will be different for the 75".

        • I doubt EKO has only licensed the use of WebOS.

          Check out the LG "Magic Remote" in the following link:
          https://www.amazon.com.au/LG-Magic-Remote-2020-AN-MR20GA/dp/...

          and then compare that with the photo of the optional "Magic Remote" under the ThinQ AI section:
          https://www.eko-entertainment.com.au/webos-tvs

          The similar hardware seems to point to that there might be more commonality under the skin aside from the OS.

        • Yes your article agrees with what I stated…

          Whatever hardware they are using the few that have bought the LG WebOS version one have been happy with their purchase. One user reported it was comparable in quality to their 3k Samsung TV.

          Hopefully that means this other Android based version is similar quality too as those other users are reporting for the WebOS version.

  • yesssss thats it, its an awesome tv, thanks

  • or just maybe before i pull the trigger, any super deal like this on a 85 inch? can be different brand

  • Great budget tv. Had no issues.

  • Is this one of those HDR TVs with 220 nits maximum brightness?

    • No idea what the brightness is but it hasn't been an issue in our lounge that has an excessive number of windows.

      The HDR makes a massive difference switching between our 2 rooms on the xbox. Playing witcher 3 at the moment and if i switch to our non hdr tv in the other room anything underground has so little detail.

      Edit: i have the other 65in without the qled.

  • What's the difference between this one and the $899 one? Just Google assistant?

  • I'm using my 75' Frameless Eko Android TV with my PS5 and it's amazing. Great buy if you're able to nab one.

  • I thought QLED technology is owned by Samsung?

    • QLED is the term Samsung uses for Quantum Dot technology. Other brands use different names.

    • Nope.

      LG (first) and Samsung (second) have both been refused QLED trademark applications in the past.

      QLED TV just stands for quantum-dot light emitting diode television. It's a generic acronym.

      Quantum dots are not proprietary to Samsung. Any manufacturer can and do use the technology, and choose to market it however they like.

      The fact you associate QLED with Samsung only proves how hard Samsung have pushed its marketing as revolutionary when it's actually just a standard feature for all mid-high end LCDs by any brand. Sony and LG market it as (trademarked) Triluminous, and Nanocell, respectfully.

      The only reason Samsung stuck with using QLED untrademarked is because of it's similarity to OLED, to dupe the consumer.

      • Quick correction.

        Sony no longer use quantum dots, as part of their GoGreen company-wide initiative (must be bad for the environment, I guess) but they did market it as Triluminous when they were using them years ago.

        They ended up making their own similar tech to replace it, but still call it Triluminous; hence my confusion.

      • The fact you associate QLED with Samsung only proves how hard Samsung have pushed its marketing as revolutionary

        Two questions..

        1) How many TV manufacturers can the general public name?

        2) How many of those manufacturers use "QLED" in their marketing?

        when it's actually just a standard feature for all mid-high end LCDs by any brand.

        Which mid-tier TVs use quantum dot LCDs?

        • TCL (TCL even call it QLED) and Hisense mid price TVs use quantum dots, for a start.

          I guess it depends what is mid-range to the average buyer to if my wording is accurate. $1000-$1500 is mid market to me when there's sub $500 and $4000-$5000 of the same sized TVs on the market.

          • @BradH13:

            TCL (TCL even call it QLED)

            TCL do not use QLED in their mid-tier TVs. They only use it in their top-end X and C series (e.g. 65C715, 65X10). Their mid and entry tier TVs (65P715, 65P615) do not use it.

            TCL isn't a big name on the general non-ozbargain public's mind when you ask them about TVs - they'll most likely name Samsung, Sony, LG, and maybe Hisense. Out of those four, only Samsung advertise "QLED", which is why people associate QLED with Samsung.

            and Hisense mid price TVs use quantum dots

            Hisense only uses them in their top-tier Q8 TVs, and they call them ULED. Their mid-tier S8 series are just "4K UHD".

            My point was that people associate QLED with Samsung because no other big name manufacturer uses "QLED", and not because Samsung "pushed its marketing as revolutionary".

            You also claim Samsung only uses QLED because it's similar to OLED, for the sole purpose of duping customers. The technology itself is called "Quantum dot display" and it's an LED TV with a quantum dot film, so "Quantum-dot LED" looks like a pretty accurate name to me.

            LG does not use quantum dots. Their Nanocell TVs use a filter to only let specific wavelengths through.

            • @eug: TCL and Hisense are mid-tier manufacturers. Even their premium models are mid-range, and are priced as such (in the range that I personally defined as mid-range). Maybe we just have a different idea of mid-range? What you consider their mid-range, I consider their low end range.

              I'm obviously not an authority on the topic, but my opinion of the range of models, I just speak relative to other high end products from the top tier brands. The mid-tier manufacturers don't compete there so I wouldn't call their top models premium.

              Yeah, you're right on LG and I was incorrect on calling Nanocell quantam-dots, but their technology produces a similar performance, same as Sony's newer Triluminous tech.

              Still, Samsung don't own QLED. Neither the technology, nor the trademark.

              • @BradH13:

                TCL and Hisense are mid-tier manufacturers. Even their premium models are mid-range, and are priced as such (in the range that I personally defined as mid-range). Maybe we just have a different idea of mid-range? What you consider their mid-range, I consider their low end range.

                Hmm, that's not what I got from your original post where you said:

                …it's actually just a standard feature for all mid-high end LCDs by any brand.

                You were saying quantum dot panels are a standard feature on mid to high-end TVs by any brand. i.e. within a brand, it is standard for the brand to include quantum dot technology in their mid and high-end TVs.

                That is simply not true. Only the high-end models within any (big-name) brand will include quantum dot technology. The middle range of any brand will not include quantum dot technology to encourage people to buy their top range.

                That said, most of Samsung's lineup is QLED as they're the biggest proponent of it and they're all expensive. :)

                What you consider their mid-range, I consider their low end range.

                Hisense has the Q8, S8, and S5 series. That's their high, middle, and low-end which is reflected in their pricing. You consider the S8 their low-end range? Then what's the S5? Extra-low-end? ;)

                65" Q8 RRP $2499
                65" S8 RRP $1699
                70" S5 RRP $1699

                Still, Samsung don't own QLED. Neither the technology, nor the trademark.

                Sure, no one was disputing that. I was just referring to the parts where you said:

                • Quantum dot technology is a standard feature on mid and high end TVs by any brand
                • The reason why people associate QLED with Samsung is because they made it out to be revolutionary (it's really because no other big-name manufacturer uses "QLED" in their models
                • The reason why Samsung uses "QLED" is so they can dupe customers into thinking it's like OLED. That probably did have some part to play, however the name is accurate. It's a quantum dot LED TV, so QLED is a fair name to use. If it was such a big deal marketing-wise, everybody would use QLED since, as you say, they can.

                Anyway this is a little pointless, it really doesn't matter in the end. :)

  • Ive owned my EKO now for a few months since the last BigW deal, the issues ive had:

    Unit will not turn on sometimes. Need to turn it off and back on at the wall
    Google Assistant on the remote does not work. Remote cannot connect to TV via bluetooth
    Occasional freezes streaming 4k content.

    I wouldnt buy one again as these are just from my first hand experiences.

    • Does Google assistant not work because you can't connect with bluetooth

    • Sounds like a good time to test Big W and EKO's customer service.

    • firmware update breaks the bluetooth pairing. Should work again after you do a factory reset.

      That said i didn't bother repairing after i did a factory reset, i just use it as an IR remote. I use the android tv ap on my phone to control it is i dont have the remote at hand.

  • I bought the 55" version a few weeks back, I'm fairly happy with it…

    The "No Signal auto power off" doesn't work, if you set it to 10mins it just tries to turn off every 10 mins when on TV or with a HDMI input.

    The DTV tuner seems weaker than my 10+yo Sanyo… I'm in a fringe area with poor reception and I've had to move my outdoor antenna to get all the channels, probably not an issue for most people but something to be mindful of if you're in an area with dodgy reception…

  • Can it be wall mounted? VESA? Wouldn't mind it if it does..

  • Anyone can help advice? If I get this TV for studyroom and does not have reception - what other gadget do I need in order to get the FTA tv?

  • what android operating system does this use and can you put the disney+ app on it which I think needs Android 5.0 (Lollipop) or newer operating system?

    • It would be hilarious if this OS was Lollipop or earlier. That firmware is like 5 years old.

    • Android TV 9.0, and yes, the Disney+ app is there… (on my 55" version)

      Page-37 of the 65" manual mentions Android 9 also:
      https://c68d849a-d265-42f7-b6b6-4575215e5156.filesusr.com/ug...

    • It is Android 9. I reached out to their customer service to check if there would be any upgrades to the latest Android version. They mentioned Android 10 is not being worked on and they may potentially provide an upgrade to Android 11 or whatever that is called probably mid to end next year. Take that with a grain of salt though.

  • Oh yeah, I'll get the best of the PS5 with this TV.

    Thanks OP