8x AA/AAA NiMH Rechargeable Batteries $9.99, Night Vision Device $159, 4 Person Tent $129 @ ALDI

1390

New catalogue, sorry about all the reflections.

Good price on the batteries, I don't remember them doing an 8 pack special before. Beats the regular $5.99 for 4 that they used to have permanently.

"Night Vision Device" just sounds cool. Feel free to post other deals from the catalogue.

Batteries available 17th March, Tent and night vis thing available 20th March.

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  • Hi OP, have you tried night vision goggles, are they worth the money?

    • I haven't, sorry.

    • Was curious and a quick google search pointed me to this

      https://www.dealsworthy.com.au/maginon-night-vision-device-a...

      They look like the ones advertised in the catalogue

    • +5 votes

      Wa wa we wa

    • These are a toy. If you want to give them to the kids to play they're okay. You will probably return them within the 60 days if you decide to try them.

    • I know someone who purchased them and returned them. Not great apparently.

    • I bought some last time they had them, back in March last year.

      Thought I might need them when coronavirus reduced society to rubble, so I could travel by night and avoid cannibalistic people hunters. Or to hunt people for meat. I forget which one it was.

    • +4 votes

      The vast majority of cheap night-vision googles are of the "projector" type: they put out a beam of infrared light, which is not visible to humans. Then the goggles part converts the received infrared back to a black-and-white image that humans CAN see.

      Most mobile phones can do this IR-to-visible conversion: use the camera app in a darkened room, and take video of a standard TV remote control, filming at the end of the remote that you normally point at the TV, while pressing some buttons on the remote. Depending on your remote, you may even be able to illuminate things 1-2cm in front of the remote control, and "see" these things in infrared.

      So you could do much the same as IR goggles with a cheap mobile phone and an IR flashlight (many available on EBay for $12-$15), but not in as convenient a package. And the goggles shield your eyes, so other people and animals aren't able to know that you are watching them.

      I seriously doubt the range quoted in the catalog (300m at night), unless you are looking for something reflective. It's just like an ordinary flashlight in that respect, the Aldi catalog suggests you can select from seven intensity levels.

      Note also that these are nothing like the thermal cameras/goggles you've probably seen on TV. Those use very-long-wave infrared, IR goggles are usually short-wave infrared. If you want a thermal camera, Amazon have a few basic models for about 120AUD, but their resolution is very low (like 32x64 pixels). Thermal cameras don't need to put out a beam of infrared light, they just receive the very-long-wave infrared that is produced by almost everything.

      • +1 vote

        So you could do much the same as IR goggles with a cheap mobile phone and an IR flashlight (many available on EBay for $12-$15), but not in as convenient a package.

        Not quite. Camera sensors have IR-cut filters on them which, as the name suggests, cuts out infrared light. They're not perfect so you'll see just a bit of the IR light from a remote control as a really dim reddish/white light. If you used a camera that has the IR-cut filter removed, like on night vision devices and CCTV cameras that are designed to work in the dark which typically have switchable IR-cut filters, you'll get a far brighter image.

        So something that was designed for night vision like the ALDI one will work much, much better than a phone camera and IR illuminator.

        Note also that these are nothing like the thermal cameras/goggles you've probably seen on TV. Those use very-long-wave infrared, IR goggles are usually short-wave infrared. If you want a thermal camera, Amazon have a few basic models for about 120AUD, but their resolution is very low (like 32x64 pixels). Thermal cameras don't need to put out a beam of infrared light, they just receive the very-long-wave infrared that is produced by almost everything.

        Thermal cameras and night vision goggles/devices are different. Classic night vision devices use image intensifier tubes. They're the ones you see on TV that have the characteristic green-colored image. They don't require infrared illuminators (which would immediately give away your position as it's literally a bright light), although they can work with it. They amplify available visible light, e.g. starlight or moonlight, to give a brighter image.

        Thermal cameras on the other hand are completely passive. As you describe, they just see in a different wavelength. Glass blocks it though, so you can't see through a window whereas night vision devices can as they amplify available light.

        • Camera sensors have IR-cut filters

          From the Wikipedia page you linked, the filters "are designed to reflect or block mid-infrared wavelengths". Mid-infrared has a wavelength of 3-8um: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared#Regions_within_the_in...

          The IR produced by LEDs, which is what most IR illuminators use (and remote controls too), is much closer to visible wavelengths than this. It's in the range of 0.85um to 0.95um, only a little outside the range of visible light (0.4-0.7um), and not blocked by the filters in cameras. It's easily demonstrated, try it and you'll see.

          • +1 vote

            @Russ:

            From the Wikipedia page you linked, the filters "are designed to reflect or block mid-infrared wavelengths". Mid-infrared has a wavelength of 3-8um: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared#Regions_within_the_in...

            The infrared region is quite large, so naturally there are many types of filters.

            The IR produced by LEDs, which is what most IR illuminators use (and remote controls too), is much closer to visible wavelengths than this. It's in the range of 0.85um to 0.95um, only a little outside the range of visible light (0.4-0.7um), and not blocked by the filters in cameras.

            It is definitely blocked by the filters on camera sensors. Here is an example of such a filter. The spectral transmittance table can be found here. You can see the transmission rapidly drops to 0% past 650nm. Higher-end cameras can have better-tuned IRCFs, and for applications where a mechanical IR cut filter is not needed (e.g. a mobile phone), the IR cut filter will usually be part of the optical low pass filter stack.

            If you really want a phone that will perform in a similar fashion to the Aldi night vision device, you will have to remove the IR cut filter. People who are into infrared photography with DSLRs/mirrorless cameras will be very familiar with the process.

            It's easily demonstrated, try it and you'll see.

            It is more easily demonstrated if you have a CCTV camera that has night vision with IR illumination. When you turn the lights off, you'll hear a click coming from the camera. That's the physical IR-cut filter being moved out of the way so the sensor can see into the IR region as well. When you turn the lights back on, for the split second before the IR cut filter is moved back into position, you'll see that the image has very poor color rendition - that is why the IR cut filter is there.

          • @Russ: That is just wikipedia being a load of crap.

            • @Namesareapain: I didn't use Wikipedia, I merely pointed out that the Wikipedia page eug linked doesn't say what he thinks it says. And he's also wrong with his "You can see the transmission rapidly drops to 0% past 650nm" claim, I just tried two different mobile phones, and they had no difficulty seeing the 940nm light from a couple of remote controls. The remote controls had zero visible light output, so it can only be the infrared that the mobile phone cameras were responding to.

              If cameras had a 650nm filter, they would be cutting off a substantial amount of the visible red spectrum, which extends to 750nm. Some red items would appear black, or at least much darker, with such a filter.

    • I have the night vision goggles, great for the hobbyist like me. I have uploaded a picture below.

      https://imgur.com/a/aEG0gdM

      OP do they have any Lacura skin care products for sale? I use heaps, can recommend also.

  • Ow, just bought 8x AAA from Ikea yesterday.

  • Doesn't look like they are ever going to sell a battery charger again, it's been years.

    • With the availability and cost of high quality battery chargers from online sources, perhaps they think it not worth it?

    • I bought Aldi's battery charger once, it was crap. Thought maybe mine was faulty, replaced, but the second one was just as crappy.

      • What was crap about it?

        • Leds in each charging bay were blinking and turning off randomly. As if the charger couldn't properly detect if each battery is fully charged or not.
          I tried it with eneloops and Aldi batteries - same thing.

  • Would love to know the capacity of those batteries if it's mentioned somewhere OP.

    For the price, I'll definitely give them a chance though. Cheers for the heads up.

    • 2400mAh and 800mAh on the packaging

    • I bought some Aldi 2100mAh AAs and tested them in the past. The capacity was substantially less than what was advertised, about 1600mAh, easily the worst of any brand I've bought in recent years.

      • Got me thinking, has any brand/product ever gone back UP in quality after time?
        Aldi batteries used to be good. The ones with the chrome finish stickers consistently test far higher than the later versions which I noticed had the matte wrapping.
        Haven't tried buying them again in the years since they turned crap.
        Like how old Japan eneloops later became crappier China versions (granted still way ahead of Aldi).

      • I have to agree with this. Both the new and old ALDI batteries (AA advertised as 2100mAh and 2400mAh) are nowhere near the advertised capacity. I've run over 40 of these batteries from various batches through the analyser over the years and they all tested between 1510mAh and 1740mAh. This is using the standard IEC testing protocol. None of the batteries come even close to 2100mAh, let alone 2400mAh.

        I also have about 12 of the AAA and they are not great either. Advertised as 800mAh, these are actually in the 690mAh-740mAh.

        The ALDI "ready to use" rechargeables are not total and utter crap, but they do have very high internal resistance (so they get hot) and have substantially lower capacity than advertised. Not a substitute for Eneloops. Heck, even Varta batteries from Bunnings fared better when tested.

  • Can anyone recommend bundle: solar panel kit ($169), 100Ah deep cycle batter ($199) and powered battert box ($49.99)? I am thinking to buy them to use for my 12V fridge. Any other recommendations are welcome. Thanks.

    • Haven't actually seen the UNpowered battery box but it looks pretty standard for about $15 less than competition. Most probably come from the same Chinese factory/ies. Check the interior specs to make sure your battery will fit.

      Some comments on the battery here , including one of mine about alternative batteries eg Giantz 5 year warranty, 140Ah, $269. 140Ah size might be a problem for a standard battery box as might weight for convenience?

      Don't forget that AGM's should only be discharged to 50% if you want them to last so you'll have ~50Ah available. Not a problem if you're topping up with solar.

      • Came to post this, 140Ah Giantz seems worth it at that price. ALDI one is probably fine for your use case too though.
        I think the solar panel is a bit expensive, plenty of cheap nasty ones on eBay that do the job if you're not looking for anything serious.

    • Check out the kits from 4wdsupacentre.com.au - I just picked up a kit and it works quite well.

    • Get a solar panel setup wired in series with a decent MPPT controller, such as a Victron. Get a lithium-ion battery instead of AGM deep cycle.

      • Do you have any recommendations for the solar panels or ideally a blanket?

        • I have a set of panels like these and also a Maxray blanket I bought on eBay. I tend to take the Maxray during reasonable weather because it is a lot smaller, a lot lighter, and so much easier to pack. If I am going for a week or so, I take both. I have made a double adapter from Anderson plugs on a long extension lead so I can charge with both sets of panels at once.
          In decent sun, the 120w Maxray will charge at about 3.5A, I'd say the newer ones might be more efficient. You can get the 160W version for $129 now locally shipped on eBay.

          I'd be getting the 200W single strip blanket for $149 if buying today, or wait and see if an eBay sale actually drops the price.

      • You just turned their $420 setup price for occasion camping into a $1500 setup.

    • Last year I kitted up to run an inverter (to charge batteries, laptop, etc) and not a fridge (I use gas for that). Some observations:

      This battery box has "Anderson" connectors, last years did not.

      From previous iterations I noticed that the batteries do not sell well, so I risked it and waited for them to get clearance pricing.

      One of them (battery or box, I forget which) had the wrong height written on the packaging and the catalogue. The battery only just fits - you need to twist it inside the box.

      Last year they had a "caravan" solar panel a few weeks after the camping one. Same specs (I think), but not folding, didn't come with a carry bag, but did come with a crude tilting mechanism, and was cheaper. I got one of these and built my own frame for it (mine is permanently mounted).

      The panels come with a cheapy charge controller. I replaced it with a Projecta equivalent (the cheapest price I could find for it was at BCF). The two CCs have different built-in voltage settings - I don't know much about the subject, but trust Projecta more than Roman to know how to charge AGM batteries.

      • The controller is likely to be a cheap PWM. Even my more expensive solar blanket came with one. MPPT regulators are considerably better/more efficient but PWM does the basic job.

        Explanation of the difference here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdAkQCA5tuY. There are plenty more videos on camping solar setups for anyone interested.

        Word of warning/advice for newcomers - these days introducing an inverter into the system adds complexity, a level of inefficiency, some danger (although I haven't read about inverter accidents in recent years), and may be unnecessary unless you need it for higher voltage (eg 240V) equipment. Before you buy an inverter do some reading and sort out what your real requirements are.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6Oj2it2bus

      • Any idea how long stuff takes to go into clearance

      • It was the battery that was mislabeled. The catalogue and the box said the battery was 212mm high. My ruler says that the body of the battery is 222mm high with another 10mm for terminals.

        Interestingly the current catalogue gives the same dimensions as last years but it has gone from 80Ah to 100Ah.

        The caravan solar panel was 170W compared to 160W for the folding one.

  • Hi guys how about the 70inch TV? Has anyone got experience with aldi TV how long is the warranty? I'm thinking to get one
    Thanks

  • Aldi NiMHs are variable quality ime. Some give up the ghost quickly.

    Battery box , canvas bags and greenhouse seem good value. Anyone care to comment on the quality of the greenhouse?

  • Remember to check the Special Buys delays page for your state, hard enough getting some specials but its extra hard when nobody has any stock in the first place anyway :)

    https://www.aldi.com.au/en/special-buys/special-buystm-produ...

    Page is not updated for the above sale yet.

  • 70" tv for $800?

    Sounds like a bargain. I wonder if the panel is decent or complete shite.

    Would be a pita to return a tv of this size.

  • Do these batteries work with an eneloop charger?

    • Yes. Eneloops are NiMHs. Aldi NiMHs are meh ime.

      • I agree and I think everyone should only buy those from Japan, but wouldn't aldi batteries be similar to those from eneloop?

        • Same shape and chemistry, yes. Apart from that batteries vary hugely in real capacity, performance and longevity. Plenty of discussion and tests can be found on forums like candlepower etc.

    • They should.
      Eneloop rechargeable batteries are also nickel–metal hydride (NiMH) based.

  • batteries.. tent.. night vision device

    I think what they are saying is yeah let's have a night vision party

  • +2 votes

    This might be great for my lepidopterology. Any deals on lotion?

  • Anyone who got this tent and can recommend it?

    • I got the tent about four years ago. It's been used about 10 times in that time period.

      I'm quite tall and can stand up fully in it.

      It's quite easy to set up and easy to pack away.

      I recommend it.

    • I have a similar one, but 6P. Easy to set up and easy to pack away. Only down side is the size/bulk. Packed length is quite long, may be a problem with smaller cars.

  • Alzori is back! Love your ALDI catalogue uploads, mate. 👍👍👍

  • How would these ALDI rechargeable batteries compare with their Eneloop counterparts?

    • Poorly, based on the half a dozen people who have commented earlier on them in this thread alone…

    • Hi here is the Choice magazine battery comparison test for the Activ Energy Rechargeable review They came 4th out of 12 batteries tested 70% Recommended
      Good points:• Ready to use and low self discharge. • Equal cheapest on test for a four pack.
      Bad points:• Availability limited to Aldi stores. • Didn't achieve more than 100 charge and recharge cycles.
      Panasonic Eneloop Pro Came 2nd out of 12 tested,73% recommended.
      Good points • Ready to use and low self discharge. • Initial capacity higher than claimed minimum capacity. • Almost two hours of use before discharging.
      Bad points • Expensive option compared to some of the other models on test.
      The Panasonic Eneloop Ready to Use Came 10th out of 12, 64% not recommended.
      Both the Panasonic Eneloop batteries scores were effected by their high RRP, but as many people note you can get them a lot cheaper than their standard price.
      In saying that The ALDI batteries were listed as $8 during the Choice test but are now $6.
      BTW Coles Recharge+ came 1st at 75%, helped by their cheap price. But ignoring price the Panasonic Eneloop Pro were the best performing battery.

    • It’s like comparing a Toyota to a Ferrari

  • Any good quality fast chargers?

  • Dammit. I guess im getting a night vision device.